Deep South News Digest – KALB News

1July 2020

Good evening Here’s a look at how AP’s news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to:

The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau at 334-262-5947 or apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau at 504-523-3931 or nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau at 601-948-5897 or jkme@ap.org

For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Deep South Editor Jim Van Anglen can be reached at 1-800-821-3737 or jvananglen@ap.org. Administrative Correspondent Rebecca Santana can be reached at 504-523-3931 or rsantana@ap.org. A reminder: this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive broadcast versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

GEORGIA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

VIRUS OUTBREAK-GEORGIA

ATLANTA — Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp says he has not yet weighed whether the state will take legal action against local governments that try to impose mask requirements, as Georgia faces a spike in confirmed coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. The Republican governor held a news conference Wednesday morning before departing on a statewide tour to promote wearing a mask, but said he will not mandate it. At the same time that Kemp spoke, Savannah became one of the first cities in the state to require people to wear a mask inside stores and other public places or face a fine. By Ben Nadler. SENT: 560 words.

AP Photos transref:GAATJ200.

CONFEDERATE MONUMENT REMOVAL

CONYERS, Ga — Another Confederate monument has been taken down from outside a Georgia county courthouse. Rockdale County Commission chairman Oz Nesbitt announced Tuesday that the county would remove the statue of a Confederate soldier from outside the courthouse building in Conyers, and it was taken down by midnight. SENT: 201 words.

RACIAL INJUSTICE-POLICE TAKEDOWN

SAVANNAH, Ga. — Body camera video shows Antonio Arnelo Smith handing his driver’s license to a Black police officer and answering questions cooperatively before a white officer walks up behind him, wraps him in a bear hug and slams him face-first to the ground. “Oh my God, you broke my wrist!” the 46-year-old Black man screams as two more white Valdosta officers arrive, holding him down and handcuffing him following the takedown. One eventually tells Smith he’s being arrested on an outstanding warrant, and is immediately corrected by the first officer: They’ve got the wrong man. By Russ Bynum. SENT: 749 words.

AP Photos transref:AX101, transref:AX103, transref:AX102.

GEECHIE BOY MILL-NAME CHANGE

NEW YORK — Geechie Boy Mill, a family-owned operation in South Carolina that makes locally-grown and milled grits, says it will change its name amid backlash from customers. The company said Wednesday it will reveal the new name once the legal requirements are met and the paperwork is complete. It joins a growing a list of brands from Eskimo Pie to Aunt Jemima that are reckoning with racist logos and marketing. By Anne D’innocenzio. SENT: 379 words.

SCHOOL THREATS-GUILTY PLEA

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — A Georgia man has pleaded guilty to threatening to attack schools in east Alabama and west Georgia with firearms and explosives. Levi Calhoun III, 28, of of Georgetown, Georgia, pleaded guilty Tuesday in U.S. District Court to threatening schools and conveying false information, news outlets reported Wednesday. SENT: 214 words.

MAIL VOTING-GEORGIA

ATLANTA — Georgia’s state election board voted Wednesday to extend a rule allowing counties to utilize absentee ballot drop boxes through elections in November. The board voted unanimously to extend that rule as well as another that lets counties begin processing but not tallying absentee ballots before election day. SENT: 216 words.

MEDIA-CNN’S RISE

NEW YORK — An extraordinary stretch of news with the coronavirus pandemic and racial reckoning triggered by George Floyd’s death has led CNN to its biggest audience for any three-month period in the network’s 40-year history. Fox News Channel and MSNBC also had record-setting quarters ending in June, according to the Nielsen company. But CNN’s audience increased at a higher pace than its rivals, and it is also seeing strong numbers for its digital operation. By David Bauder. SENT: 645 words.

AP Photos transref:CAPM301.

FORCED LABOR-HUMAN HAIR

UNDATED — Federal authorities in New York on Wednesday seized a shipment of weaves and other beauty accessories suspected to be made out of human hair taken from people locked inside a Chinese internment camp. U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials told The Associated Press that 13 tons (11.8 metric tonnes) of hair products worth an estimated $800,000 were in the shipment. By Martha Mendoza. SENT: 925 words.

AP Photos transref:NYWM201, transref:NYWM203, transref:NYWM204, transref:NYWM202, transref:WX105.

FELONS VOTING-FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — A federal appellate court has stayed a lower court ruling that gave impoverished Florida felons the right to vote. The order issued Wednesday disappointed voting rights activists and could have national implications in November’s presidential election. In May, a federal judge in Tallahassee ruled that Florida law can’t stop an estimated 774,000 disenfranchised felons from voting because they can’t pay back any legal fees and restitution they owe. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Robert Hinkle called the law a “pay-to-vote system.” By Bobby Caina Calvan. SENT: 494 words.

ELECTION 2020-REPUBLICANS

DENVER — When Lauren Boebert was asked in May about QAnon, she didn’t shy away from the far-right conspiracy theory, which advances unproven allegations about a so-called deep state plot against President Donald Trump that involves satanism and child sex trafficking. “Everything that I’ve heard of Q, I hope that this is real because it only means that America is getting stronger and better, and people are returning to conservative values,” she said. By Jim anderson, Nicholas Riccardi and Alan Fram. SENT: 913 words.

AP Photos transref:COGRA301, transref:COGRA322.

IN BRIEF:

— OFFICER BITTEN-ARREST — A Georgia man who struggled with police while being taken into custody has been accused of biting the tip off of a police officer’s nose, authorities say.

— PEOPLE-21 SAVAGE — Rapper 21 Savage will be launching a free online financial literacy education program for youth sheltered at home during the coronavirus pandemic. AP Photos transref:CAPM202.

— GINSENG SCAM-SENTENCE — A Minnesota woman has been sentenced to more than four years in prison after pleading guilty in an elaborate ginseng farm fraud scheme, prosecutors said Wednesday.

IN SPORTS:

NCAA-COMPENSATING ATHLETES

UNDATED — Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey told a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday there needs to be a uniform federal law to regulate the compensation of college athletes instead of a series of state versions with differing requirements. Sankey was part of a panel discussing the potential impact of allowing athletes to profit from the use of their name, image or likeness (NIL), one of the more controversial issues in college athletics. By Aaron Beard. SENT: 673 words.

AP Photos transref:DCSW115, transref:DCSW107, transref:DCSW101, transref:DCSW103, transref:DCSW104, transref:DCSW106, transref:DCSW113.

BKN–NBA RESTART-TEAMS RETURN

UNDATED — Most of the 22 remaining NBA teams were taking the court for the first mandatory workouts in nearly four months Wednesday, as the league continued prepping for the restart of the season at the Disney campus near Orlando, Florida. Workouts are still individual in nature, but are no longer voluntary. By Basketball Writer Tim Reynolds. UPCOMING: 750 words, photos by 5 p.m.

SOUTH CAROLINA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

VIRUS OUTBREAK-SOUTH CAROLINA

COLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina reported more people in the hospital and more deaths from COVID-19 on Wednesday than any day since the pandemic began in March, overwhelming the ability to track cases and try to slow the spreading outbreak, the state’s top infectious disease specialist said. The spike in cases started just after the Memorial Day weekend. With the July 4th holiday weekend looming, state Epidemiologist Dr. Linda Bell said she fears unless people take precautions against the virus seriously, hospitals will be strained to the limit and the death toll will be stunning. By Jeffrey Collins. SENT: 612 words.

AP Photos transref:SCCOL201.

GEECHIE BOY MILL-NAME CHANGE

NEW YORK — Geechie Boy Mill, a family-owned operation in South Carolina that makes locally-grown and milled grits, says it will change its name amid backlash from customers. The company said Wednesday it will reveal the new name once the legal requirements are met and the paperwork is complete. It joins a growing a list of brands from Eskimo Pie to Aunt Jemima that are reckoning with racist logos and marketing. By Anne D’innocenzio. SENT: 379 words.

CENTENE-NORTH CAROLINA EXPANSION

RALEIGH, N.C. — Government health insurance provider Centene Corp. said on Wednesday it will build an East Coast campus in Charlotte, North Carolina, developing a $1 billion construction project that’s expected to create more than 3,200 new jobs by 2032. Gov. Roy Cooper described the expansion as the state’s largest single jobs announcement by number in nearly two decades. By Gary D. Robertson. SENT: 612 words.

FACEBOOK ADS-HOUSING LAWSUIT

SILVER SPRING, Md. — Some of the nation’s leading property management companies deliberately excluded older people from seeing Facebook advertisements for dozens of apartment complexes in the Washington, D.C., area, a housing watchdog alleged in a lawsuit filed Wednesday. The Housing Rights Initiative billed its federal class action as the first lawsuit to accuse residential property management companies of engaging in “digital discrimination” in housing advertising. By Michael Kunzelman. SENT: 549 words.

IN BRIEF:

— MONUMENT VANDALIZED — Two people accused of placing an incendiary device at the foot of a monument to an avowed racist at the South Carolina Statehouse were arrested Wednesday, authorities said. AP Photos transref:RPJC102.

— POLICE CHASE-BYSTANDER KILLED — A woman checking her mail outside her South Carolina home was struck and killed by a car being chased by police, authorities said.

— FATAL PLANE CRASH-MILITARY — A military pilot has died in the crash of a fighter jet during a training mission at Shaw Air Force Base in South Carolina.

IN SPORTS:

BKW—DAWN STALEY-OLYMPICS

NEW YORK — Coach Dawn Staley would be prepping the U.S. women’s basketball team for the Tokyo Olympics this week if not for the coronavirus pandemic. Instead, she’ll hold a Zoom conference call Wednesday with players who are vying for a spot on the roster in 2021, if the postponed Olympics are held next year. By Melissa Murphy. SENT: 462 words.

AP Photos transref:NYDB562.

NCAA-COMPENSATING ATHLETES

UNDATED — Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey told a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday there needs to be a uniform federal law to regulate the compensation of college athletes instead of a series of state versions with differing requirements. Sankey was part of a panel discussing the potential impact of allowing athletes to profit from the use of their name, image or likeness (NIL), one of the more controversial issues in college athletics. By Aaron Beard. SENT: 673 words.

AP Photos transref:DCSW115, transref:DCSW107, transref:DCSW101, transref:DCSW103, transref:DCSW104, transref:DCSW106, transref:DCSW113.

ALABAMA (all times Central)

TOP STORIES:

VIRUS OUTBREAK-ALABAMA

MOBILE, Ala. — Mobile and Tuscaloosa have joined the list of Alabama cities requiring face masks to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus, as cities look for ways to curb rising infections and hospitalizations. The Mobile City Council voted 6-1 on Wednesday for an ordinance requiring facial coverings in public places for the next 30 days. SENT: 483 words.

AP Photos transref:ALMON101.

SCHOOL THREATS-GUILTY PLEA

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — A Georgia man has pleaded guilty to threatening to attack schools in east Alabama and west Georgia with firearms and explosives. Levi Calhoun III, 28, of of Georgetown, Georgia, pleaded guilty Tuesday in U.S. District Court to threatening schools and conveying false information, news outlets reported Wednesday. SENT: 214 words.

IN BRIEF:

— SHOOTING-CHILD — A 5-year-old Alabama boy was shot and wounded Tuesday while riding in a car, authorities said.

IN SPORTS:

NCAA-COMPENSATING ATHLETES

UNDATED — Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey told a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday there needs to be a uniform federal law to regulate the compensation of college athletes instead of a series of state versions with differing requirements. Sankey was part of a panel discussing the potential impact of allowing athletes to profit from the use of their name, image or likeness (NIL), one of the more controversial issues in college athletics. By Aaron Beard. SENT: 673 words.

AP Photos transref:DCSW115, transref:DCSW107, transref:DCSW101, transref:DCSW103, transref:DCSW104, transref:DCSW106, transref:DCSW113.

LOUISIANA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

VIRUS OUTBREAK-LOUISIANA

BATON ROUGE, La. — Louisiana has recorded its largest daily coronavirus case spike since April, and the mayor of Baton Rouge announced Wednesday that she is requiring people to wear masks inside businesses in hopes of stemming the worrisome spread of the disease. Nearly 2,100 new cases of the COVID-19 disease caused by the coronavirus were confirmed over the past day in Louisiana residents, and hospitalizations continued to tick upward. The state is regularly lodging around 1,000 new positive cases each day, numbers that are starting to look like early April — before the impacts of a statewide stay-at-home order drove down new infections. By Melinda Deslatte. SENT: 760 words.

AP Photos transref:LAGH110, transref:LAGH113.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-BUSINESS GRANTS

BATON ROUGE, La. — Louisiana will start accepting applications July 28 from small businesses seeking up to $15,000 grants to help with coronavirus expenses, Treasurer John Schroder announced Wednesday. The Republican state treasurer said he will use three contractors to help run the website portal for applications. They are to review and approve grant recipients and market the program, which will hand out at least $260 million in grants. By Melinda Deslatte. SENT: 473 words.

AP Photos transref:NYCD203.

RACIAL INJUSTICE-DIXIE STATE UNIVERSITY

SALT LAKE CITY — After years of resisting calls to change, a university in Utah is considering dropping “Dixie” from it’s name in another example of the nation’s reexamination of the Confederacy and slavery. Dixie State University, located about 300 miles (480 kilometers) south of Salt Lake City, has faced scrutiny in the past over its name, but resisted changing. Settlers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, many of them from the South, moved to the St. George area in the 1800s. The university’s decision to revisit the issue comes amid a national outcry against racial injustice and police brutality following the death of George Floyd. By Sophia Eppolito. SENT: 836 words.

AP Photos transref:UTSGS222, transref:UTSGS321, transref:UTSGS322, transref:UTSGS221, transref:UTSGS601.

ABUSE RECORDED

KENNER, La. — A Louisiana man faces dozens of criminal charges related to the beating and sexual abuse of a 26-year-old man with cerebral palsy. The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate reports that court records show weeks of abuse was recorded by surveillance equipment at the victim’s home in the New Orleans suburb of Kenner. Jefferson Parish court records show 39-year-old Patrick Bowden pleaded not guilty on June 25 to five counts of being a principal to sexual battery and 74 counts of cruelty to the infirm. SENT: 213 words.

2020 CENSUS

ORLANDO, Fla. — Homes in six states across the U.S. can expect to get knocks on their doors from census takers in two weeks as part of a soft launch of the next phase of the largest head count in U.S. history, Census Bureau officials said Wednesday. Starting in mid-July, homes whose residents haven’t yet answered the 2020 census around Beckley, West Virginia; Boise, Idaho; Gardiner, Maine; Kansas City, Missouri; New Orleans; and Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, will get visits from census takers hoping to ask them about who lives in their household and the residents’ race, sex, Hispanic origins and relations to each other. By Mike Schneider. SENT: 416 words.

AP Photos transref:TXTG102, transref:TXTG101, transref:PAJOH101, transref:NYDD204.

RACIAL INJUSTICE-DIXIE STATE UNIVERSITY

SALT LAKE CITY — After years of resisting calls to change, a university in Utah is considering dropping “Dixie” from its name in another example of the nation’s reexamination of the Confederacy and slavery. Dixie State University, located about 300 miles (480 kilometers) south of Salt Lake City, has faced scrutiny in the past over its name, but resisted changing. Settlers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, many of them from the South, moved to the St. George area in the 1800s. The university’s decision to revisit the issue comes amid a national outcry against racial injustice and police brutality following the death of George Floyd. By Sophia Eppolito. SENT: 861 words.

AP Photos transref:UTSGS222, transref:UTSGS321, transref:UTSGS322, transref:UTSGS221, transref:UTSGS601.

IN BRIEF:

— NEW SHERIFF — A southwest Louisiana parish has a new sheriff.

— VIRUS OUTBREAK-TULANE-DONATION — An anonymous donor’s $1 million gift to Tulane University will support infectious disease research and will aid efforts to develop treatments and a vaccine for COVID-19, the university said Wednesday.

— DOG ABUSE-SENTENCED — A Louisiana woman pleaded guilty Tuesday to abusing a mixed Dachshund-Chihuahua named Buddy.

— BIRTHDAY BOAT RIDE-2 DEAD — A birthday boat ride turned to tragedy with the deaths of a Mississippi couple on the lake where they own a vacation home.

IN SPORTS:

FBN-OFFSEASON UPDATE-PLAYER CONCERNS

Some NFL players are raising concerns about playing football amid the coronavirus pandemic while others are ignoring advice of medical experts by working out with teammates. JC Tretter, a center on the Cleveland Browns and president of the NFL Players Association, wrote an open letter to players on Tuesday, saying they have to fight for “necessary COVID-19 protections.” By Rob Maaddi. SENT: 888 words.

AP Photos transref:NY154, transref:NY155.

NCAA-COMPENSATING ATHLETES

UNDATED — Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey told a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday there needs to be a uniform federal law to regulate the compensation of college athletes instead of a series of state versions with differing requirements. Sankey was part of a panel discussing the potential impact of allowing athletes to profit from the use of their name, image or likeness (NIL), one of the more controversial issues in college athletics. By Aaron Beard. SENT: 673 words.

AP Photos transref:DCSW115, transref:DCSW107, transref:DCSW101, transref:DCSW103, transref:DCSW104, transref:DCSW106, transref:DCSW113.

BKN–NBA RESTART-TEAMS RETURN

UNDATED — Most of the 22 remaining NBA teams were taking the court for the first mandatory workouts in nearly four months Wednesday, as the league continued prepping for the restart of the season at the Disney campus near Orlando, Florida. Workouts are still individual in nature, but are no longer voluntary. By Basketball Writer Tim Reynolds. UPCOMING: 750 words, photos by 5 p.m.

MISSISSIPPI (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

VIRUS-OUTBREAK-MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said Wednesday the state is pausing its efforts to reopen the economy after a recent surge in new reported coronavirus cases. “Things are getting worse, not better,” Reeves said at a news briefing. SENT: 489 words.

XGR—PAROLE-BILL-MISSISSIPPI

JACKSON, Miss. — The Mississippi Legislature has passed a bill that could grant thousands of incarcerated inmates a chance at parole. The Mississippi Correctional Safety and Rehabilitation Act of 2020, or SB 2123, was approved by the House and Senate on Tuesday after a couple of lawmakers raised concerns about the effect releasing prisoners could have on law enforcement. By Leah Willingham. SENT: 655 words.

BIRTHDAY BOAT RIDE-2 DEAD

VICKSBURG, Miss. — A birthday boat ride turned to tragedy with the deaths of a Mississippi couple on the lake where they own a vacation home. Warren County Coroner Doug Huskey identified the couple on Wednesday as James Reno Jr., 57, and Debra Reno, 61, of Raymond, news agencies reported. Monday, the day the couple went boating, was Debra Reno’s birthday, he said. SENT: 205 words.

RACIAL INJUSTICE-CONFEDERATE FLAG-MISSISSIPPI

JACKSON, Miss. — Mississippi officials held a ceremony Wednesday to retire the former state flag and send it to a history museum, a day after Republican Gov. Tate Reeves signed a law removing official status from the last state banner in the U.S. that included the Confederate battle emblem. “We have much to be proud of and much to reckon with,” House Speaker Philip Gunn said during the ceremony. “This flag has flown over our best and our worst. Some flew it over their bravery to defend their homeland. And for others, it’s been a shadow over their struggle to be free.” By Emily Wagster Pettus. SENT: 633 words.

AP Photos transref:NYSH702, transref:MSRS101, transref:MSRS102, transref:MSRS105, transref:MSRS114, transref:MSRS111, transref:MSRS108.

XGR-JUSTICE-BILLS-MISSISSIPPI

JACKSON, Miss. — Two criminal justice bills aimed at helping former prisoners re-enter the workforce have stalled in the Mississippi Legislature after lawmakers couldn’t come to an agreement. Democratic Sen. John Horhn of Jackson said that Ban The Box Act and Fresh Start Act are “dead for all intents and purposes.” Horhn said negotiators could not come to a consensus. By Leah Willingham. SENT: 519 words.

AP Photos transref:MSRS102.

IN SPORTS:

NCAA-COMPENSATING ATHLETES

UNDATED — Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey told a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday there needs to be a uniform federal law to regulate the compensation of college athletes instead of a series of state versions with differing requirements. Sankey was part of a panel discussing the potential impact of allowing athletes to profit from the use of their name, image or likeness (NIL), one of the more controversial issues in college athletics. By Aaron Beard. SENT: 673 words.

AP Photos transref:DCSW115, transref:DCSW107, transref:DCSW101, transref:DCSW103, transref:DCSW104, transref:DCSW106, transref:DCSW113.

___

If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them them to:

The Atlanta AP Bureau: apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau: apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau: apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau: nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau: jkme@ap.org

Source: kalb.com

Our Score
Click to rate this post!
[Total: 0 Average: 0]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Upgrade Your Listing

Add images, video, and more details to your listing! More information means more clicks. More clicks means more quotes!

Free listing includes: business name, address, phone, website, google map

Upgraded listing includes: business name, address, phone, website, EMAIL ADDRESS, COMPANY LOGO, VIDEO, IMAGE SLIDE SHOW, FEATURED LISTING PLACEMENT